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Round Robin Scheduling

Define a small fixed unit of time called a quantum (or time-slice), typically 10-100 milliseconds. Then: 

• Process at head of the ready queue is allocated the CPU for (up to) one quantum.

• When the time has elapsed, the process is preempted and added to the tail of the ready queue. 

Round robin has some nice properties:

• Fair: if there are n processes in the ready queue and the time quantum is q, then each process gets 1/nth of the CPU. 

• Live: no process waits more than ( n − 1) q time units before receiving a CPU allocation. 

• Typically get higher average turnaround time than SRTF, but better average response time. But tricky choosing correct size quantum: 

• q too large 

⇒ FCFS/FIFO

• q too small 

⇒ context switch overhead too high.

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